Improve traditional processes and inspire new ideas with 3D printing

12.21.2016

3D printing technology can improve traditional processes and inspire new ideas.

All industries can benefit from 3D print applications from engine prototypes to medical implants. Duncan-Parnell was especially inspired by Animal Orthocare and their use of 3D printing to revolutionize the animal prosthesis process.

C


CLP 168

So the dog will come in and they need the prosthesis and we will cast their legs and I’ll do the same initial part of it which is the casting and then filling the mold with plaster of paris I’ll hand sculpt it out I can do that in about 5 minutes. It’s pretty quick to just do that. Then we’ll pull the foam on over the top of the positive mold like this. And then from here that’s when we can scan it and make the foot pieces as we need to and get those printed and then we’ll back in form the pieces over top of the printed parts as well to make a hybrid design.

Q: So when you’re capturing your geomotries that’s manual from start to finish?

Yes And then from there pretty much the biggest printed part that we need is the actual foot piece so that’s all we’re printing on these which is nice because we have an unlimited design capability.

Q: So you capture your pattern manually, using the Sense 3D scanner to digitize that in 3D then you’re able to clean up this file?

Yes, we really don’t need to clean it up really so much because I mean it’s already, this is already done exactally where we want it to but then we’ll scan it and then yeah, just build right off of it.

Q; So what does this allow you to do, with being able to digitize all this geometry?

Two nice things is like I said the limitless design capabilites, we can design anything, we can print anything out. Which is nice so it gives everyone a different type of option. We would have had to have build from scratch these things so we can build it on the computer, get it printed, get the form over top of it and it also, you know if there is an adjustment that needs to be made we don’t have to build it from scratch again we can just increase the height change the width, anything we needed to do on the printout and do it again instead of doing the whole thing over again. Those are the two main functions with going digital.

Q; So what kind of impact has that had on how quickly you can turn around prosthesis, how much more business you can bring in?

It’s, the best thing is just the ability to keep everything on a file and if they need another one printed again, so it’s mainly for you know, having muliple devices, some people want two or three devices just to have backups so it’s very easy to do that. So again trying to copy something we did initially, we’re never going to be able to copy it. (Right, right) But if we 3D scan and print, it’s always going to be exactly the same.

Q: Now I have wondered this for a while, dog comes in and gets fitted for it’s first splint, how long does that last. What’s the lifespan of that part and how often do they have to be, I mean I am assuming that they would have to be replaced as the animal grows older.. or gets bigger..

Yeah, in certain cases, so this again will work really well for a dog that’s growing so if it’s a 5 week old dog and he’s going to get multiple pairs as he grows, again we can just increase the height on the computer get those printed. We can even do it at the beginning and show them what’s going to happen. So again that’s another factor there that’s good with growing dogs, replacement parts, duplicating their prosthesis exactly and for exotics. Like theres a lot of dogs or animals that we can’t cast so we have to scan them. So there’s like birds, like a duck you know I’m not going to cast a duck’s leg or someones not going to be able to get a good mold anywhere so they could actually scan overseas and then send us the file and that’s a good way when we can’t cast them.

Q: So that opens up your (cast area?) a little bit.

Yes, eventually when this gets more into play in all the doctors facilities they’ll be scanning legs and sending those, I mean we do right off from MRI’s as well. So right now, they’ll send an image to us an MRI or anything and we can bring that into a free form and then build right on that so eventully that is what it is going to get to.

Q: Have you talked to a lot of doctors who are .. starting to move towards 3D capture?

They are. Um, well it’s still at the beginning phases I would say.

Q: So have you talked to a lot of doctors who are starting to bring 3D scanning or 3D capture into their pactices?

Yeah, the more progressive ones. I mean it’s still, uh, the science is still pretty new to them and everybody so the ones that are on board are real interested in sending us all these scans and being able to build off that but like I said, I think in the next couple of years a lot of people are going to be turning over to that.

Q: Well, lets take a look at how you use to do things.

Yeah we can go to the shop.

CUS Pros on scanner

Cus with hands on

CLP 169

Not on cam So they were able to just send us the MRI and we were able to open it up and print it right out.

Q: So this is a , what is this?

So a doctor sent us, this is the actual dog laying down in a MRI booth, I believe in Arizona and they were able to just scan him and send it to us and if we were going to build a pros from it we can’t cause this dog is missing their entire limb. Uh, if he had the limb we’d just have to get it to scale and we could used that as the positive mold. And build upon that.

Q: So that saved a bunch of pain and expense of exploritory surgury to open the dog up and say okay we can’t..yeah, yeah, wow.

Yeah, it saveds time and shipping so I don’t have to ship a casting kit to the facility have them ship the negative mold to us. They can just literally scan and email it to us.

Not on cam:

This is wild this is Star Trek right here.

Yeah, eventually just no casting kits.

For the human world it’s a cost reduction not quite yet for the vet world cause evetrything’s so cheap cause there’s no insurance. That’s the issue.

CLP 170

Cu finished pros with Joe vo;

They use it for Boeing 777 and the F35 strike fighter and a couple other airplanes use this material. It’s been certified by the FAA. It’s been ceritifed because it is super strong. It’s the best out there. Q: When did you do this? 3 momths ago maybe.

CLP 171

So this is a little bit different, umhum, it is one of the world’s first 3D printed cainine carts. So again we casted this dog down in FL and then we made the positive mold here with the plaster and then scanned that mold and then we built this whole cart using free form. So yea, we just pretty much scanned the mold once we got the positive mold and built it right off of that. So it’s pretty cool we used the SLS pinter with a real nice durable plasitc.

Q:How long do you expect that to last?

This should last forever really. This looks pretty durable most of our parts last as least the life of the dog. The only problem was the dog gained about 30 lbs. laugh

One of the world’s first.

Q: What does it say on the back?

Susie the princess

CLP 172

Negative molds.

CLP 173

Studio w2shot Joe and D talking

W to cu 2shot J&D holding molds/finished products

CU Joes hands holding blk mold with paw prints.

CLP 174

CU Joes hands with pros red/wht/blk with D’s hands pointing stuff out.

Q:So you had his original geo from when you did the capture? (Yeah, we did). So how long did this take?

Um, I mean we can build them fast, we can. I mean it takes about 4 hours apeice to build from scratch. But we actually use the 3D printed mold to build right over those.

(D moving to get mold out of drawer) So here is Derby’s legs

Q: So you don’t have to start from scratch like you would if your doing (Yeah) plaster wrap (right) you can just wrap these guys cause you already have them on file (we already have them done so you just print them out.

Joe putting mold into pros cart.

So we’re just trying to prototype and do different things and then you can print out those parts once there…

CU of putting pros in cart.

Joe cu hands: That is really cool that just pops right in

Joe: I would have probably been bitten a couple of times by now cause I fumblling around D: I’ve only ever been bitten a couple times ever.

*******

CU still J: And you said this took you how long to do the design?

Pullout D: yeah, I mean took 4 hrs really I mean it can be something where you print out the piece but I’ve also been trying to figure out other ways to do it. So this is just a sheet of aluminum and I just bent it around. *****Again, you have to build that from scratch and I cant do unlimited design it has to be just kind of a loop. But if I print it out we can do anything. J: Metal’s 3D printer.D: Yeah

CLP 175

So traditionally, we would send casting kits all over the world and the owner or vet would take a neg mold of the dogs leg, or other animal, and ship that to us and we sould take these molds and we’d actually fill them with plaster of paris so we would get the postive mold. And I would hand sculpt these. From there we would take these positive molds and bring them to our vacume system. We would heat up different plastics in an oven rigth here and then vacume form and drape mold all the plastics and componentry right over the psotive mold. What we are going to start doing is , we take MRI’s and CT scans or even regular 3D scans and people can email those to us. And they’ll send those and we’ll get the positive mold. We can print that mold here and then build right upon the printed positive mold.

Cu mold with hand.

CU oven

CLP 176

So we wont have to store these anymore. If people want a brace or anonther pros down the road, say 6 years down the road, we don’t have to keep 6 years worth of molds here. This is about 6 months worth. So we’re going thru each box and we’re going to put them on that turntable scan them all in and if someone calles we can just build right off of there.

Q; It’s funny too because storage space is expensive and it doesn’t make you any money soi you could replace all of this with a thumb drive. (Yeah) and not lose anything.,

Also, we can we’re starting to make a lline of off the shelf products. So we can take, by breed, we’ll actually scan in each…say we want a stifle brace a knee brace.. we’ll take all the stifle braces and then we’ll break them down by breed by size by weight and then we’ll have a great just a nice way to make the parts prefabricated. That’s when we’re going to be printing out everything.

Q: Could you do that without 3D c=scanning or printing?

No. Yeah, we need that were going to have a huge database of all the breeds of all the types of braces we use and just take averages so we can just have parts premade for our off the shelf line.

CLP 177

Shots of bins of molds.

CLP 178

CU molds

CLP 179

2shot

So with this this is the first off the shelf stifle brace which is a knee brace for dogs. What we’re doing is using the set scanner to scan all of our molds to get a big database to make the parts,. Each individual part for this brace so we are going to redesign it off all the scans we do.

Q: So you can do a digital data capture in 3D erase what you don’t need and print the prototype that you can test immediately?

Exactly. Rapid prototyping.

CLP 180

2shot

Q: So you established a business doing things traditionally, you were doing hand plaster , hand molding what has 3 D done for you?

The biggest benefit we achieved from having 3D capabilities is really the unlimited design capabilites so we can pretty much desing anything we need now and we don’t have to build it from scratch. So that’s one thing and also reproduction, We can reproduce each part that we design over and over again instead of having to build it from scratch. So those are the biggest things also like we said the storage space. We can scan evvery single one of our molds and not have to keep years worth of molds in the back and call upon those any time just thru a thumb drive.

Derick thank you very much. Great no problem.

CLP 181 Stifle brace

You are taking your design cycle from here to and just kind of flatten it. Oh yeah, this will be the biggest money maker. ‘the new business. This is going to be MY Bionic Pets.

CLP 182

Sign

CLP 183

Sign

CLP 185

3D printer.

CLP 186

Cus molds of darby legs and red cart.

CLP 189

Derrick at desk typing.LP 168

So the dog will come in and they need the prosthesis and we will cast their legs and I’ll do the same initial part of it which is the casting and then filling the mold with plaster of paris I’ll hand sculpt it out I can do that in about 5 minutes. It’s pretty quick to just do that. Then we’ll pull the foam on over the top of the positive mold like this. And then from here that’s when we can scan it and make the foot pieces as we need to and get those printed and then we’ll back in form the pieces over top of the printed parts as well to make a hybrid design.

Q: So when you’re capturing your geomotries that’s manual from start to finish?

Yes And then from there pretty much the biggest printed part that we need is the actual foot piece so that’s all we’re printing on these which is nice because we have an unlimited design capability.

Q: So you capture your pattern manually, using the Sense 3D scanner to digitize that in 3D then you’re able to clean up this file?

Yes, we really don’t need to clean it up really so much because I mean it’s already, this is already done exactally where we want it to but then we’ll scan it and then yeah, just build right off of it.

Q; So what does this allow you to do, with being able to digitize all this geometry?

Two nice things is like I said the limitless design capabilites, we can design anything, we can print anything out. Which is nice so it gives everyone a different type of option. We would have had to have build from scratch these things so we can build it on the computer, get it printed, get the form over top of it and it also, you know if there is an adjustment that needs to be made we don’t have to build it from scratch again we can just increase the height change the width, anything we needed to do on the printout and do it again instead of doing the whole thing over again. Those are the two main functions with going digital.

Q; So what kind of impact has that had on how quickly you can turn around prosthesis, how much more business you can bring in?

It’s, the best thing is just the ability to keep everything on a file and if they need another one printed again, so it’s mainly for you know, having muliple devices, some people want two or three devices just to have backups so it’s very easy to do that. So again trying to copy something we did initially, we’re never going to be able to copy it. (Right, right) But if we 3D scan and print, it’s always going to be exactly the same.

Q: Now I have wondered this for a while, dog comes in and gets fitted for it’s first splint, how long does that last. What’s the lifespan of that part and how often do they have to be, I mean I am assuming that they would have to be replaced as the animal grows older.. or gets bigger..

Yeah, in certain cases, so this again will work really well for a dog that’s growing so if it’s a 5 week old dog and he’s going to get multiple pairs as he grows, again we can just increase the height on the computer get those printed. We can even do it at the beginning and show them what’s going to happen. So again that’s another factor there that’s good with growing dogs, replacement parts, duplicating their prosthesis exactly and for exotics. Like theres a lot of dogs or animals that we can’t cast so we have to scan them. So there’s like birds, like a duck you know I’m not going to cast a duck’s leg or someones not going to be able to get a good mold anywhere so they could actually scan overseas and then send us the file and that’s a good way when we can’t cast them.

Q: So that opens up your (cast area?) a little bit.

Yes, eventually when this gets more into play in all the doctors facilities they’ll be scanning legs and sending those, I mean we do right off from MRI’s as well. So right now, they’ll send an image to us an MRI or anything and we can bring that into a free form and then build right on that so eventully that is what it is going to get to.

Q: Have you talked to a lot of doctors who are .. starting to move towards 3D capture?

They are. Um, well it’s still at the beginning phases I would say.

Q: So have you talked to a lot of doctors who are starting to bring 3D scanning or 3D capture into their pactices?

Yeah, the more progressive ones. I mean it’s still, uh, the science is still pretty new to them and everybody so the ones that are on board are real interested in sending us all these scans and being able to build off that but like I said, I think in the next couple of years a lot of people are going to be turning over to that.

Q: Well, lets take a look at how you use to do things.

Yeah we can go to the shop.

CUS Pros on scanner

Cus with hands on

CLP 169

Not on cam So they were able to just send us the MRI and we were able to open it up and print it right out.

Q: So this is a , what is this?

So a doctor sent us, this is the actual dog laying down in a MRI booth, I believe in Arizona and they were able to just scan him and send it to us and if we were going to build a pros from it we can’t cause this dog is missing their entire limb. Uh, if he had the limb we’d just have to get it to scale and we could used that as the positive mold. And build upon that.

Q: So that saved a bunch of pain and expense of exploritory surgury to open the dog up and say okay we can’t..yeah, yeah, wow.

Yeah, it saveds time and shipping so I don’t have to ship a casting kit to the facility have them ship the negative mold to us. They can just literally scan and email it to us.

Not on cam:

This is wild this is Star Trek right here.

Yeah, eventually just no casting kits.

For the human world it’s a cost reduction not quite yet for the vet world cause evetrything’s so cheap cause there’s no insurance. That’s the issue.

CLP 170

Cu finished pros with Joe vo;

They use it for Boeing 777 and the F35 strike fighter and a couple other airplanes use this material. It’s been certified by the FAA. It’s been ceritifed because it is super strong. It’s the best out there. Q: When did you do this? 3 momths ago maybe.

CLP 171

So this is a little bit different, umhum, it is one of the world’s first 3D printed cainine carts. So again we casted this dog down in FL and then we made the positive mold here with the plaster and then scanned that mold and then we built this whole cart using free form. So yea, we just pretty much scanned the mold once we got the positive mold and built it right off of that. So it’s pretty cool we used the SLS pinter with a real nice durable plasitc.

Q:How long do you expect that to last?

This should last forever really. This looks pretty durable most of our parts last as least the life of the dog. The only problem was the dog gained about 30 lbs. laugh

One of the world’s first.

Q: What does it say on the back?

Susie the princess

CLP 172

Negative molds.

CLP 173

Studio w2shot Joe and D talking

W to cu 2shot J&D holding molds/finished products

CU Joes hands holding blk mold with paw prints.

CLP 174

CU Joes hands with pros red/wht/blk with D’s hands pointing stuff out.

Q:So you had his original geo from when you did the capture? (Yeah, we did). So how long did this take?

Um, I mean we can build them fast, we can. I mean it takes about 4 hours apeice to build from scratch. But we actually use the 3D printed mold to build right over those.

(D moving to get mold out of drawer) So here is Derby’s legs

Q: So you don’t have to start from scratch like you would if your doing (Yeah) plaster wrap (right) you can just wrap these guys cause you already have them on file (we already have them done so you just print them out.

Joe putting mold into pros cart.

So we’re just trying to prototype and do different things and then you can print out those parts once there…

CU of putting pros in cart.

Joe cu hands: That is really cool that just pops right in

Joe: I would have probably been bitten a couple of times by now cause I fumblling around D: I’ve only ever been bitten a couple times ever.

*******

CU still J: And you said this took you how long to do the design?

Pullout D: yeah, I mean took 4 hrs really I mean it can be something where you print out the piece but I’ve also been trying to figure out other ways to do it. So this is just a sheet of aluminum and I just bent it around. *****Again, you have to build that from scratch and I cant do unlimited design it has to be just kind of a loop. But if I print it out we can do anything. J: Metal’s 3D printer.D: Yeah

CLP 175

So traditionally, we would send casting kits all over the world and the owner or vet would take a neg mold of the dogs leg, or other animal, and ship that to us and we sould take these molds and we’d actually fill them with plaster of paris so we would get the postive mold. And I would hand sculpt these. From there we would take these positive molds and bring them to our vacume system. We would heat up different plastics in an oven rigth here and then vacume form and drape mold all the plastics and componentry right over the psotive mold. What we are going to start doing is , we take MRI’s and CT scans or even regular 3D scans and people can email those to us. And they’ll send those and we’ll get the positive mold. We can print that mold here and then build right upon the printed positive mold.

Cu mold with hand.

CU oven

CLP 176

So we wont have to store these anymore. If people want a brace or anonther pros down the road, say 6 years down the road, we don’t have to keep 6 years worth of molds here. This is about 6 months worth. So we’re going thru each box and we’re going to put them on that turntable scan them all in and if someone calles we can just build right off of there.

Q; It’s funny too because storage space is expensive and it doesn’t make you any money soi you could replace all of this with a thumb drive. (Yeah) and not lose anything.,

Also, we can we’re starting to make a lline of off the shelf products. So we can take, by breed, we’ll actually scan in each…say we want a stifle brace a knee brace.. we’ll take all the stifle braces and then we’ll break them down by breed by size by weight and then we’ll have a great just a nice way to make the parts prefabricated. That’s when we’re going to be printing out everything.

Q: Could you do that without 3D c=scanning or printing?

No. Yeah, we need that were going to have a huge database of all the breeds of all the types of braces we use and just take averages so we can just have parts premade for our off the shelf line.

CLP 177

Shots of bins of molds.

CLP 178

CU molds

CLP 179

2shot

So with this this is the first off the shelf stifle brace which is a knee brace for dogs. What we’re doing is using the set scanner to scan all of our molds to get a big database to make the parts,. Each individual part for this brace so we are going to redesign it off all the scans we do.

Q: So you can do a digital data capture in 3D erase what you don’t need and print the prototype that you can test immediately?

Exactly. Rapid prototyping.

CLP 180

2shot

Q: So you established a business doing things traditionally, you were doing hand plaster , hand molding what has 3 D done for you?

The biggest benefit we achieved from having 3D capabilities is really the unlimited design capabilites so we can pretty much desing anything we need now and we don’t have to build it from scratch. So that’s one thing and also reproduction, We can reproduce each part that we design over and over again instead of having to build it from scratch. So those are the biggest things also like we said the storage space. We can scan evvery single one of our molds and not have to keep years worth of molds in the back and call upon those any time just thru a thumb drive.

Derick thank you very much. Great no problem.

CLP 181 Stifle brace

You are taking your design cycle from here to and just kind of flatten it. Oh yeah, this will be the biggest money maker. ‘the new business. This is going to be MY Bionic Pets.

CLP 182

Sign

CLP 183

Sign

CLP 185

3D printer.

CLP 186

Cus molds of darby legs and red cart.

CLP 189

Derrick at desk typing.

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